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Month: February 2017

Book Review: Strangers In A Strange Land (Charles Chaput)

This is a self-help book.  I don’t mean it’s to be found in the bookstore under the sign “Self-Help,” where people gather to remake their lives by unlocking the secret of costless auto-regeneration.  Rather, this is a self-help book because it, like the famous Kitchener poster, points at the reader and says, “You—there is a problem, and you are the solution.”  Of course, since the author, Charles Chaput, is a bishop (and an archbishop at that), and this is not Pelagianism, the reader is not expected to act in isolation, but with the guidance and help of God.  He is to act nonetheless, and much hinges on what he does.

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Book Review: Tamerlane: Sword of Islam, Conqueror of the World (Justin Marozzi)

I, and many others, have been exhausted in recent months by the nonstop political noise machine. So I pulled this book off the shelf, figuring that a biography of the 14th Century warlord Tamerlane would be pretty much non-political. Maybe not as non-political as a coffee table book about, say, flowers, but close, and to me more interesting. I was not disappointed. This book proved an informative escape—depressing at times, certainly, like any tale of violence, but at least I didn’t have to think or talk about 21st Century politics at any time, and won’t in this review. For like all of us, I am weary unto death of all that (though not weary enough to not return to it).

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Book Review: The Rise and Fall of American Growth (Robert Gordon)

This book is just not very good.  I was excited to read The Rise and Fall of American Growth; it was extensively and positively reviewed and it promised to illuminate an important topic by giving extended, specific analysis.  In particular, I wanted to learn about changes in productivity over time.  Instead, I first got an interminable, plodding exposition, which repeated commonly known facts ad nauseum for its first 600 pages.  But I soldiered on, knowing that the last 100 pages were analysis of current problems and of future productivity.  I should have cut my losses—those last 100 pages are exemplars of rank illogic and incoherence.  It didn’t end there, either—the book is then, at the last, capped by shrill, unsupported demands that America ingest a massive dose of insufferable and, at best, non-effective, leftist nostrums, considerably more pernicious than the 19th Century patent medicines the author unoriginally decries.  When I finished this book, I had to drink a fifth of cheap whiskey just to dull the pain, but now that the hangover is gone, I am rousing myself to write this review.

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Book Review: The Weapon Shops of Isher (A.E. van Vogt)

The right to be armed is the right to be free!  This call, like the battle cry of the Archangel Michael, Who is like God?!, echoes down the ages of Man.  If you are not armed, you are always wholly at the mercy of tyrants.  Who can argue with such a truism?  A lot of people, actually.  For the phrase does not, in fact, echo down the ages of Man.  It dates only to 1941, when this book, a now obscure science fiction classic, was first published—and the principle itself is not much older.  So, rather than making this review the pro-weapons screed my (few) readers doubtless expect, I will explore the principle itself—in particular its limitations within a conservative philosophical framework.

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Book Review: The Age of Reagan: The Fall of the Old Liberal Order: 1964-1980 (Steven Hayward)

I read The Age of Reagan, the first volume of a massive two-volume biography, because I wanted to learn more about Ronald Reagan.  I knew something about Reagan’s presidency, having been an adult for part of it, and that Reagan had been Governor of California, a popular speaker and commentator, head of the Screen Actors Guild, and an actor himself.  But I knew very little about how Reagan came to be President.  This book filled in many of the gaps.  However, as the author, Steven Hayward, makes clear up front, it is a book not about Reagan, but the Age of Reagan.  That is, it covers American political life from 1964 to 1980, with Reagan as a key character, but it is not really a biography of Reagan, at least in the traditional sense.

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Book Review: The Golden Key
(George MacDonald)

This is a very famous book, not quite children’s fairy tale and not quite adult allegory—or rather, it’s both, and more.  As fairy tale and as allegory, it has so light a touch as to be ethereal, combined with a feeling of enormous substance.  There is, for child or adult, little obvious moral, yet the reader is left with a feeling of transcendence.  Quite an accomplishment in what is really just a short story, and doubtless why the book is still famous today.

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Book Review: The Almost Nearly Perfect People (Michael Booth)

Published in 2014, this book has an eerie vibe, redolent of a past that seems distant but really was just yesterday.  Intertwined with gentle criticisms of Nordic foibles is an iron self-confidence that “we,” a group constantly referred to but never defined, desire above all things “modernism”:  absolute equality of result and a rejection of sex differences, collectivism, atheism, multiculturalism, the death of traditional cultures through multiculturalism, and the active, aggressive suppression of any view or speech deemed “right-wing.”  Viewed from the post-Brexit, post-Trump, pre-Le Pen perspective of early 2017, this seems as quaint as nostalgia for steam locomotives.  It worships something that was hollow and imaginary then and is now, fortunately, being dragged out, still struggling weakly, to be thrown on the ashheap of history.  Reading this book is like seeing a man venerate a statue of Mithras—it just seems odd, with a frisson of fading menace.

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Colloquy: On Christian Duty As Related To President Trump’s Executive Order On Immigration

[This is designed to be a colloquy regarding the recent executive order by President Trump, relying on authority granted by Congress to temporarily bar most entry into the US by individuals from seven named, predominantly Muslim, countries.  As always, responses of interlocutors are in italics, color-coded to differentiate different interlocutors.]

The topic here is (as phrased by me; feel free to correct!), “what is the duty of individual Christians, in their personal lives and their political activity, with respect to the matters covered by Trump’s executive order?”  This choice of topic therefore necessarily excludes analysis of the legality/constitutionality of the order and its wisdom as a political matter.

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Book Review: The Great Heresies
(Hilaire Belloc)

For no reason that is fully clear to me, I have always been fascinated by heresies.  It matters to me what the difference between a Monothelite and a Monophysite is.  Hence, I thought this book (from 1938, by the famous Catholic writer Hilaire Belloc) would survey various heresies and would explain, as its title says, the “Great Heresies.”  But that is not what this book is.

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Colloquy: On Global Warming

[This is a back-and-forth to a response to that portion of my review of Milk which suggested five specific reasons why any public policy advocacy position could be taken, only one of which was rational analysis, and indicated that the demand for action to combat anthropogenic global warming was distorted by those reasons, but without those reasons being adequately adverted to.  Italics are my interlocutors; regular text is me.  The interlocutor in the first set of responses is a different person than the interlocutor in the second set, who is different than the third.  Each interlocutor is therefore identified by text of a different color.]

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