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Category: Left-Liberalism

Book Review: The Color of Law
(Richard Rothstein)

Some years ago, I lived for a time in Oak Park, Illinois.  Oak Park has for decades been filled with rich white liberals, who live just across the street from a City of Chicago neighborhood, Austin, that is filled with poor black people.  Yet, for some reason the citizens of Oak Park simply can’t fathom, people from Austin almost never move to Oak Park.  Who can say why?  Well, Richard Rothstein can.  His book, The Color of Law, shows all the ways in which the racist government of Oak Park, and innumerable other government functionaries across the nation, have aggressively worked for decades to keep black people in inferior, segregated housing.  Rothstein’s service is to precisely set out why this happened, how it was done, and what exactly the effects today are.

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Analysis: On Rebellion

[This post duplicates my review of Captain Blood, without the book-specific parts.  I am cross-posting it because it fits in two categories, Reviews and Analysis.]

American history is full of rebellion—the War of Independence and the Civil War, of course, but also unsuccessful smaller-scale rebellions—Shay’s Rebellion, the Whiskey Rebellion, Nat Turner’s Rebellion, John Brown’s assault on Harper’s Ferry, and the leftist rebellions of the 1970s.

We can conclude that rebellion is relatively commonplace and that it arises from different causes.  What I want to talk about is when it is intellectually and morally justified.  We will examine theory and practice, Aquinas and Rogue One.  I am sure that writing this will probably get me on some list, or rather some additional lists, and prevent my being appointed to any government position—at least, in the current dispensation.  But since I doubt if the current dispensation will last, this is probably not the hobbling it seems.

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Book Review: Captain Blood
(Rafael Sabatini)

Captain Blood, to the extent it is mentioned today, is remembered as a 1935 movie that made the career of Errol Flynn.  The story was originally this novel, published in 1922.  It is the story of an Irish physician who, in the late Seventeenth Century, settles in the southwest of England, in Somerset, after wandering the world for a decade.  He is caught up in the Monmouth Rebellion, in which a bastard son of Charles II rebelled against James II and lost the 1685 Battle of Sedgmoor, the last battle fought on English soil.  Captain Blood (his name is Peter Blood; the title is not a nickname, as one might think of a pirate novel), treats a man wounded in the battle.  He is therefore dealt with as a traitor, even though he took no part in the rebellion itself, but his death sentence is commuted to being sold into slavery in Barbados.

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Book Review: Hue 1968 (Mark Bowden)

I have a confession to make.  The first history I learned about the Vietnam War was from watching the move Rambo, in 1985.  Around the same time, and viewable on VHS (what’s that, Daddy?) if you missed it in the theater, were movies like Platoon and Full Metal Jacket, the later set during the battle that is the focus of this book.  From these movies, naturally, I learned little real history, and haven’t learned much more about Vietnam since.  In fact, when I was a young lawyer at a giant law firm, I used to amuse myself by needling the senior partners, rich, aging hippies all, by telling them that I thought of World War I and the Vietnam War as roughly contemporaneous, and equally relevant to the modern age—that is, not at all.  They were not amused.

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Book Review: Indian Country
(Kurt Schlichter)

In the distant past—five months ago—I believed our country could heal its divisions.  Sure, we’d always have disagreements, and sure, our new President was always going to be unpopular with a lot of people. But, after all, he had won a democratic election.  The Left would regroup, consider why its offerings had been rejected, and perhaps dial back its extremism.  But I was wrong.  The Left has instead doubled down on hatred.  This was shown yesterday, when the fear and anger created and nurtured by the Left over the past two decades, deliberately whipped to a fever pitch in the past months, caused the first attempted political assassinations of Republican Congressmen.  In this harsh light, the split of the country originally posited by Kurt Schlichter in People’s Republic no longer seems as unrealistic as I thought in my November 2016 review of that book.  As Schlichter accurately says, “Yes, the Left hates Trump, but its hatred is really for us.”

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Book Review: Churchill & Orwell (Thomas Ricks)

The heroes of every age are often not seen as heroes during their lives, or if so viewed in their own age they are not so viewed in later ages.  And doubtless perceptions of heroes change as one future passes into another.  But for us, today, Churchill and Orwell are heroes to many, and whatever else may be true, this alone gives the two men something in common.  Thomas Ricks uses this commonality as the springboard and organizing theme for his book, which is a competently written capsule biography of its title subjects, combining examination of the men with examination of their time.  His book offers both an interesting narration of known facts and some fresh insights by the author—neither an easy feat when dealing with heroes.

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Book Review: Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right (Arlie Hochschild)

Arlie Hochschild has gone the extra mile, and then some, to understand conservatives.  I would say that she exemplifies the (pseudo-) Indian saying, “Never criticize a man until you’ve walked a mile in his moccasins,” except that is not politically correct, so I will not say it.  Nonetheless, Hochshild has spent a lot of time and effort genuinely trying to understand a group of Louisiana conservatives, and the result is a very interesting book.  Sure, it’s not perfect, in part because Hochschild, like most of us, can’t fully overcome her own biases that sometimes lead her to engage in unsophisticated analysis.  But she is never once contemptuous or patronizing of these people, whom she seems to really regard as her friends, and she never caricatures the individuals, who actually vary from each other quite a bit.  This enables her to, overall, do an excellent job (and a better job than Joan Williams in the more recent White Working Class, which covers very similar topics in an obtuse way).

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Book Review: White Working Class
(Joan Williams)

Joan Williams wants to “Overcome Class Cluelessness in America.”  This is an admirable goal, and in many ways this is an admirable book (or brochure—it’s very short).  But reading White Working Class (which, despite its title, gives equal time to both the white and black working class) makes the reader squirm.  The reader appreciates the author’s, Joan Williams’s, attempts to objectively examine her class, that of the “professional-management elite,” or “PME,” but winces at her frequent inability to actually understand the working class, or to view the working class other than primarily as potential foot soldiers in the march of progressive politics.

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Book Review: The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age (James Kirchick)

This is a silly and shallow book.  But it is not worthless, because it serves to exemplify and clarify modern political fracture lines.  In the West, the major political split today is between those who view the modern liberal project of maximum individual freedom and maximum democracy (as long as the voters make the correct choices) as the ultimate and unquestionable good, and those who view that project as either inherently defective or sharply limited in the good it brings to humanity.  If Ryszard Legutko, in his criticism of European “liberal-democracy” in The Demon in Democracy, had conjured that demon to physical form, it would be James Kirchick—although, perhaps, Kirchick would manifest only as an imp or familiar, in thrall to some greater demon lurking in the wings, such as George Soros.

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Book Review: Conserving America? (Patrick Deneen)

This book, a book of essays, is effectively a companion to Ryszard Legutko’s The Demon In Democracy.  The core theme of both books is that “liberal democracy” is inherently defective; the books explore why and what that implies.  Whereas Legutko’s project is to compare liberal democracy to Communism, to explain their similarities and what that has meant for post-Communist Europe, Patrick Deneen’s is to explain how the American founding itself implies liberal democracy, and therefore, in a culture that needs renewal from the evils created by liberal democracy, conservatives are wrong to call for a return to the Founding—for, like the serpent in the Garden, the evil has been there since the beginning.

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